Takesada Matsuntani

A great sensuality, a latent eroticism is also expressed in these works.

Painter, engraver and creator of installations, Matsutani has always sought to evolve his art.

Trained in Nihonga painting, traditionally made of Japanese materials, whether by technique or supports, Matsutani moves away from it as his work becomes more abstract. It began to experiment with matter in the early 1960s. Vinyl glue became its preferred material, spread on cotton cloth (chosen because of its low cost), and possibly mixed with an oil used in building work . Matsutani covers his canvases with circular shapes, glue bubbles (some of which burst), which he creates by blowing air into the material with a straw and then drying . He patiently covers his surfaces with minute graphic pencil strokes, oblique or intertwined, the artist questions space and time, immobility and movement, without turning away from more formal concerns. Matsutani draws some of his inspiration from the organic forms present in blood samples observed under a microscope in a friend’s laboratory. A great sensuality, a latent eroticism is also expressed in these works.

 

Takesada Matsutani was born in Osaka in 1937. In the early 1960s, Matsutani was one of the members of the second generation of the Gutai Art Association from 1954 to 1972. In 1966 Matsutani moved to Paris and Began working with William Hayter in his studio. It was in 1984 that Matsutani created one of his greatest compositions, 10 meters wide, which the artist covered with graphite, leaving just a white line in the middle of the gigantic leaf.

TWO CIRCLES

Polyvinyl acetate adhesive,
graphite pencil,
Japanese paper on canvas

H 120 x 96 cm
H 47.2 x 37.8 in.

IN BETWEEN

Polyvinyl acetate adhesive,
graphite pencil,
Japanese paper on canvas

H 195 x 130 cm
H 78 ¾ x 51 in.

IN BETWEEN II

Polyvinyl acetate adhesive,
graphite pencil,
Japanese paper on canvas

H 195 x 130 cm
H 78 ¾ x 51 in.

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