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Eugène Printz

He used the rarest exotic woods, including palm wood, set off with gilded bronze, finished and inlaid with precious enamels.

The self-taught French cabinetmaker and decorator Eugene Printz (1889–1948) was first exposed to furniture design in his father’s Parisian workshop and through dedicated visits to the city’s museums.

For Printz, furniture was a luxury, which required the finest materials and the most skillful refinements. He used the rarest exotic woods, including palm wood, set off with gilded bronze, finished and inlaid with precious enamels. The use of palm wood required both master skill and an appetite for challenge; it involved cutting into a trunk composed of thin wafers with tiny rebel fibres of fine reddish-blond stripes. Printz would make the use of this wood his signature mark.

A high society favourite, he conceived designer Jeanne Lanvin’s offices and the private apartments of the Princess de la Tour d’Auvergne at the Château de Gros-Bois.

FLOOR LAMP, 1932

Gaboon ebony veneer,
oxidised brass, white lacquer

H 178 cm
H 70 inches

ARMCHAIRS

Set of four walnut armchairs

Varnished walnut armchairs with
flared sculptured backs and shaped
armrests, resting on four legs.

H 85 x W 56 x D 56 cm
H 33,5 x W 22 x D 22 inches

BAR

Mahogany bar with a drop
front and two doors

Signed at the back

H 132 x W 90 x D 35 cm
H 52 x W 35 x D 14 in.

SIDEBOARD

Six doors sycamore and blond copper
sideboard encircled by a blond
brass stick with hollowness feet
underlined with patinated bronze.

H 119 x 216 x 41 cm
H 47 ¼ x 85 x 15 ¾ in.

DESK

Palm veneer, oxidized brass legs

H 75 x 130 x 70 cm
H 29½ x 51¼ x 27½ in.

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